Blog

Hood 2 Hood this Sunday

Hood2Hood event in Mukuru 16th of September 11am – 5pm

We want to celebrate and communicate the research carried out by The AIR Network team. We want to let the community and the wider world know about what has been taking place up to now and get feedback on what we have done and plan to do next.

We will be running the event in Rueben stadium on Sunday 11am – 5pm.

Here is some of what will be going on:

Display of the AIR Network maps

Creating murals to illustrate project findings

Story-telling events

An exhibition of work by local school children to describe their experiences of air pollution

Live performances of songs created by Mukuru musicians especially for the AIR Network

Live interactive theatre performances and group games

Face painting and clowns

Opportunities for group discussions about the project, what to do next and how to take forward community-driven ideas for solutions to the problem of local air pollution

DJs, MCs, singing and dancing

Please come and join us!!

The story behind the logo, by Jared Omae

In this blog, Mukuru resident and designer of the AIR Network logo Jared Omae talks us through his design:

AIR logo V2

“The green colour represents the environment and nature of our community. The yellow colour represents the nature of our slums – this means that everything in Mukuru has been polluted – starting from the air, water, drainage and natural resources, these are yellow.

At the bottom are the industries that pollute the environment and the air we breathe, and a charcoal stove that pollutes the air inside the houses as people prepare food.”

Jared can be followed on twitter: @omaemukuru.

Participatory mapping in Mukuru

We’ve got loads happening in the AIR Network this September. This week alone we’ve seen our Mukuru-led solutions group starting work on a theatre piece to identify sources and causes of air pollution, with the aim of coming up with sustainable solutions, and started our participatory mapping work. This work is with the Engaging with Industry group, and our talented artists have made a beautiful base map of the area and are taking it around the settlement to get information about where industrial pollution is bad. This will help us to identify ‘hotspots’ of pollution and specific industries that we can try and work with to find ways of reducing their contribution to air pollution.

Participatory mapping

SEI’s Annemarieke de Bruin ran some training on participatory GIS for three Mukuru residents earlier this year, which has put them in good stead for this work. We are looking forward to seeing the outputs later this year.

To follow along all the activities in Mukuru on social media (Facebook and twitter) search for #AIRnetwork

 

The AIR Network’s interdisciplinary working agreement

The main aim for our project is to develop an interdisciplinary research partnership of African and European researchers and African community members, with the long-term goal of creating innovative, participatory solutions to air pollution and its effects on human health in low-resource settings in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, we know working together with people from different disciplinary backgrounds and with different life experiences can be challenging. At our workshop in Mukuru informal settlement in Nairobi  in January 2018, we decided to address this head on. Researchers and community members worked together in groups to discuss the challenges they had experienced in working in an interdisciplinary way…and there were lots!

Interdisc_challenges

Bearing in mind these challenges, we then asked participants to think about how we want to work together differently in the AIR Network. Participants brainstormed the personal attributes of a ‘good interdisciplinary team member’, which we compiled and agreed on as a group. These form the basis of the AIR Network’s interdisciplinary working agreement, and includes having patience, respecting others, listening, being generous, and having a sense of humour.

Working agreement

When the going gets tough in our project, we will use the agreement to remind ourselves of how we all agreed to work together. We’ll let you know how well it works!

Working in groups

Post by Heather Price, Stirling University

 

Mini-projects

We have all been busy deciding what to do for our ‘mini-projects’ – the main work of the AIR network in this first phase. Proposals have been developed, budgets worked out, and then they were submitted to our advisory board for comment. The four mini-projects we are going to work on this year are….

Raising Awareness – aiming to raise awareness of air pollution amongst Mukuru residents

Mukuru Action Against Air Pollution – aiming to identify potential solutions to air pollution in Mukuru

Engaging with industry for Hewa safi, Afya bora (Clean air, Good health) – opening up dialogue between surrounding industry and Mukuru residents

Prioritising policies for cleaner air in Mukuru – engaging decision makers to prioritise and implement actions relating to air quality

DSC_0736
Pitching ideas for mini-projects at the January workshop

 

Community workshop in Mukuru – Jan 15-18 2018

A workshop with researchers, practitioners and community members from Mukuru will take place in the Ruben Community Centre in Nairobi, from January 15 to 18 2018

The workshop aims are to

  • learn more about each other and local context
  • develop a common language among all project partners
  • develop work plan and co-design four mini-projects related to air pollution awareness raising